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Updated: 11 years 21 weeks ago

Mandarin use both sides of brain, English left only....

Fri, 06/27/2008 - 05:36

Author: Lateralus

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 11:36 pm



@ grancher. I can but agree with the last part of your post,commitment and motivation are important!

Authentic Chinese name

Thu, 06/26/2008 - 14:59

Author: anon6969

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 8:59 am



I want a authentic Chinese name that people can't tell I'm a foreigner simply by reading.

I also want the same name to be authentic in Japanese and pronounced the same.

And in Korean too.

Both Family name and given name.

Is it possible?

English movie subtitled by chinese

Thu, 06/26/2008 - 13:39

Author: bbjt

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 7:39 am



Here is a good exemple of how an english movie could be subtitled by a chinese translator.
Thong (丁字裤) becomes Song (歌)
Is 丁字裤 a dirty word in chinese ?

Adjusting to Intermediate

Thu, 06/26/2008 - 08:40

Author: leosmith

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 2:40 am



dgc wrote: Yes, immersion requires a lot of discipline and burn-out is an issue, so it probably works better with people who have a long academic history, at least an undergraduate degree. There are probably more efficient ways of learning over a longer period, but for short term gain total immersion works well.
Immersion is essentially living in the target language. It could involve a lot of actual study, or none at all. I just wanted to point out that there is a difference between immersion and studying diligently for 12 hours per day.

This method is good for people who do better in a short burst, like the previous poster.

dgc wrote: I started using this method after talking to a linguistics professor about his experiences studying Indonesian. He had studied Indonesian at university for three years using the traditional text book methods, but his conversational skills were still very basic. He then volunteered for an aid project in Indonesia and had to do a two week crash course in colloquial Indonesian when he arrived in Jakarta. For two weeks he had to sit in a class all day listening and repeating dialogues constantly. Initially he thought this was a ridiculous way to learn a language, he had no time to study grammar or even look up a dictionary, but at the end of the course he realised he had learnt more Indonesian than he had during 3 years at university.

I had a similar "textbook" experience studying Chinese and could not make much progress with colloquial language skills, everytime I went to China I could not understand a word anybody said. It was very frustrating so I decided to try "crash or crash through" immersion and was rather surprised that it worked.
I agree that both of the bad results you mention are a result of not studying enough hours per day. They were too far below the "sweet spot" that I mentioned before. Most university and college classes fall into this catagory. 168 hrs in 14 days is probably better than 168 hrs in a year, so you're probably onto something.

Adjusting to Intermediate

Thu, 06/26/2008 - 06:32

Author: dgc

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2008 12:32 am



Yes, immersion requires a lot of discipline and burn-out is an issue, so it probably works better with people who have a long academic history, at least an undergraduate degree. There are probably more efficient ways of learning over a longer period, but for short term gain total immersion works well.

I started using this method after talking to a linguistics professor about his experiences studying Indonesian. He had studied Indonesian at university for three years using the traditional text book methods, but his conversational skills were still very basic. He then volunteered for an aid project in Indonesia and had to do a two week crash course in colloquial Indonesian when he arrived in Jakarta. For two weeks he had to sit in a class all day listening and repeating dialogues constantly. Initially he thought this was a ridiculous way to learn a language, he had no time to study grammar or even look up a dictionary, but at the end of the course he realised he had learnt more Indonesian than he had during 3 years at university.

I had a similar "textbook" experience studying Chinese and could not make much progress with colloquial language skills, everytime I went to China I could not understand a word anybody said. It was very frustrating so I decided to try "crash or crash through" immersion and was rather surprised that it worked.

How to ask a (perhaps Chinese) person if he speaks mandarin?

Wed, 06/25/2008 - 22:27

Author: grancher

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:27 pm



Maybe to say "Can you speak English?" you might use '能' 你能不能说普通话?That sounds kind of rude to me, but then the whole question feels a little awkward.
What I usually hear people here say is 我说话你听得懂吗?

Mandarin use both sides of brain, English left only....

Wed, 06/25/2008 - 22:10

Author: grancher

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:10 pm



I agree with Matt Whyndham, adults have a lot of things babies don't have, they can notice patterns and play games with grammar, words and pronunciation. Adults can make a lot of connections and most things expressed in the new language are already familiar, so they do not need to spend time understanding very many underlaying concepts. I have no scientific evidence of any kind to back me up here, but I am inclined to think that a focused young adult can learn a language faster than a baby. For circumstantial evidence; one student at the school where I work has gone from a pretty basic English level to commanding a substantial vocabulary with reasonable grammar and pronunciation within three months. Of course she was studying 70 hours a week for most those three months, and is far from mastering the language, but I think that is something that few American high school (or even college?!) students can claim. From my own experience the greatest barrier to learning a language is commitment and motivation, if you have these two you can find the other things you need.

Twitter

Wed, 06/25/2008 - 20:20

Author: billglover

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 2:20 pm



http://twitter.com/billglover

Adjusting to Intermediate

Wed, 06/25/2008 - 20:13

Author: luhmann

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 2:13 pm



For me, massing studies has been the most effective strategy. Immersion works, moreover, the more you are exposed to the language, the least likely you are to forget what you have previously studied, as you keep stumbling on the same words over and again, before the critical time where you start to forget them (this is especially important if your learning material is non-progressive). Most of what I have learned was on short periods of massing several hours a day of studies. It seem to work fairly well, I can retain what I have learned even after several weeks of indolence. I wished a had the diligence continue studying at least one hour a day no matter what, but currently the best I can get myself to do is just some haphazard studying, which efficiency-wise is just a waste of time... oh but I'll be back on track soon, I hope...

Twitter

Wed, 06/25/2008 - 13:43

Author: Matt Whyndham

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 7:43 am



He can't see the point, but "whyndham" prattles on anyway.

Input methods (OSX) .. QIM

Wed, 06/25/2008 - 13:37

Author: Matt Whyndham

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 7:37 am



Thread here, on the Chinese Mac Google Group, advocating QIM as an alternative to OSX's built-in input methods.

http://tinyurl.com/4j8czv

It's claimed that QIM offers benefits even for the relative beginner. But I'm not convinced.

Any other views on this? In particular, have you used QIM and could you say why it's so much better than what I've got already?

cheers, Matt

Adjusting to Intermediate

Wed, 06/25/2008 - 10:30

Author: leosmith

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:30 am



dgc wrote: Here is a method I have used in the past, a sort of DIY crash course: Take a 2 week holiday and make sure you do not have any commitments that will distract you. Preferably go on a trip somewhere or just get away from your normal environment. Everyday listen to lessons and read the transcripts, at least 12 hours per day. Do not repeat the same lesson, even if you did not understand much, move straight to the next lesson. Do not stay at intermediate level, push yourself to upper intermediate and advanced. Repeat the dialogue sentences constantly, trying to mimic the native speaker as perfectly as possible. Do NOT try to memorise characters or tones, do not use flashcards or vocab trainers, they are too boring and time consuming, just get through as many lessons as possible. If you get through a whole lesson set, go back to the beginning and start again, or have another set of learning resources available to add variety. I use the Popular Amercian lessons on the VOA website here: www.freexinwen.com. After a couple of weeks your listening and reading comprehension will improve significantly. After two weeks test yourself with the exercises on cpod.

Beginner and elementary learners should probably not try this method, but for intermediate and above it works well.

This reminds me of the Listening-Reading System. I agree that if a person studies 168 hours in 14 days, they'll see more improvement than say 14 hours of study in 14 days. However, I believe they'll see less improvement than studying 168 hours over 168 days. If you have the time and inclination and your goal is to improve as much as possible over the course of 2 weeks at any cost, then by all means try this method.

I believe that:
Most people don't have the free time to do this. Most don't have the inclination. Most don't have the concentration, and become ineffective and demotivated after a few hours per session. It's more efficient to study in shorter intervals (30 min to 1 hr). 168 hours of quality study beats 168 hours of burnt out study. Time helps things sink in. It's better to spread out learning over a long period of time, but there is a sweet-spot, which depends on the person and her situation. 5 minutes per day is too little, and 15 hours is too much. It's probably between 1 and 5 hours for most people.

Matt Whyndham wrote: yes I would. drop nth language to better the (n-1)th
I choose to study several languages at once, and use the benefits of time to make me as efficient as possible. Using the same number of hours, I'd rather learn 3 languages every 10 years than 1 language every 5 years.

Matt Whyndham wrote: and yes, work fewer hours. 40 is reasonable. 50 is maybe OK, if you are getting the benefits. 60+ is taking the pss, though I'm sure most of the commercial world takes a different view.
If I work 40 hours per week, I will have to work 6 months per year. If I work 60, I will have to work 4 months per year, and will get paid more due to higher overtime rates. In my profession, it is hard to find a job that will allow one to work 50 hrs or less per week. 60 hour per week jobs are easy to find.

online dictionary

Tue, 06/24/2008 - 20:58

Author: hihayeah

Posted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 2:58 pm



http://bab.la/

The quizzes are great! I can learn a lot!

General phrase translation requests

Tue, 06/24/2008 - 11:09

Author: anon6969

Posted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:09 am



"The woman of my dreams, the woman who owns/reigns my heart, whom i love more than anything in the world, till eternity."

我梦中的女人, 拥有我的心的女人, 在这个世界上我爱她胜过一切,直到永远

Could anyone suggest a book for me?

Tue, 06/24/2008 - 07:55

Author: light487

Posted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 1:55 am



Quote: Secondly, Chinese language's unique feature is that the language symbols are illustration of the shapes of natural objects, This is different from western languages of which the symbols are illustration of sounds.

You are right. I am not disagreeing with you but I often look at the characters and the radicals that are contained within them and scratch my head how that could possibly be a "fish" or a "baby" or a "<insert thing here>". The only characters I have come across that look like their meanings are things like the characters for 1, 2 and 3.. and the character for "sheep". There are others but yeh.. it's not always as clear as the textbooks say.

General phrase translation requests

Tue, 06/24/2008 - 00:01

Author: mandrake

Posted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 6:01 pm



Hello everyone!
I want to write a dedication to my girlfriend in chinese. Unfortunately, my chinese is not very good. I'm very uncertain how to write it correct...
So maybe someone here could help me with translating. I would very appreciate it. The sentences i want to translate are:

"The woman of my dreams, the woman who owns/reigns my heart, whom i love more than anything in the world, till eternity."

Thank you very much in advance!

车不好,人好 - I need to get the meaning straight

Mon, 06/23/2008 - 21:49

Author: dennis001

Posted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:49 pm



He was mocking GuLao had rather rided with a female with crappy car than sit next to him in a BMW.(refers to the previous scene GuLao get off from a automoblie).

using ji3 shi2

Mon, 06/23/2008 - 19:59

Author: nickjs

Posted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:59 pm



Elizabethjin wrote: ji3shi2 几时 it means "when"
it was used in the ancient times and in classical Chinese books.
but now, Chinese seldom speak ji3shi2 几时, because it sounds strange. it is better to say "shen mo shi hou"


Well in SIngapore here, my chinese friends dont seem to understand 'shen me shi hou' (not because i pronounce it wrongly) and i always hear them saying ji3 shi2, so guess i have to follow the way they speak :S

Confused on some words

Mon, 06/23/2008 - 19:56

Author: nickjs

Posted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:56 pm



da jia hao, i am confused on how to use xuǎn zé , tiāo xuǎn, tiāo and xuǎn alone.. care to explain how and when to use each words above? would be great if can provide some sentence examples..thank you

cheers

Recent Spamming

Mon, 06/23/2008 - 19:33

Author: James

Posted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:33 pm



And thank you Bazza for all you've selflessly done for the community!